Small-scale (flash) flood early warning in the light of operational requirements

A paper entitled “Small-scale (flash) flood early warning in the light of operational requirements: opportunities and limits with regard to user demands, driving data, and hydrologic modeling techniques” by colleagues and me is accepted for publication in PIAHS. I will have a talk on the subject at the 7th IAHS/ICWRS meeting in Bochum.

Results of hourly, threshold-oriented evaluation for DeHM, DaHM and ScoHM output in the Mandau pilot area, based on Area Under Curve values. Lead times range from 6 to 36 hours, update cycle is 12 hours. OM: ombrometer data (i.e., gridded rain gauge data); RADOLAN: QPE from weather radar scans; QF-50: 50th percentile of Quantile Forecast; COSMO-DE: numerical weather prediction output. Skill for DeHM at a lead time of zero is based on true model output after assimilation/updating and can be slightly smaller than unity (e.g., apparent for Großschönau 2).

Results of hourly, threshold-oriented evaluation for DeHM, DaHM and ScoHM output in the Mandau pilot area, based on Area Under Curve values. Lead times range from 6 to 36 hours, update cycle is 12 hours. OM: ombrometer data (i.e., gridded rain gauge data); RADOLAN: QPE from weather radar scans; QF-50: 50th percentile of Quantile Forecast; COSMO-DE: numerical weather prediction output. Skill for DeHM at a lead time of zero is based on true model output after assimilation/updating and can be slightly smaller than unity (e.g., apparent for Großschönau 2). [Figure taken from the paper]

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